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Table 1 Studies on spinal infections (including vertebral osteomyelitis) secondary to trans-abdominal injuries

From: Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis complicating abdominal penetrating injury: case report and review of the literature

Author Study design Mechanism of injury Patients included Incidence of spinal infections Antibiotic coverage
Romanick 1985 [4] Retrospective Low speed gunshot wounds 20 7/8 colon perforations At least 2 days, broad spectrum
→12 bowel perforations:
→ 4 upper GI tract
→ 8 colon
Roffi 1989 [5] Retrospective Low speed gunshot wounds 42 3/14 colon perforations Extended course (6 to 14 days)
→14 colon perforations
Kihtir 1991 [15] Retrospective Gunshot wounds 21 0/21 patients 48 hours
→ 5 colon perforations
Lin 1995 [13] Retrospective Low speed gunshot wounds 29 0/29 patients 2 to 5 days
→ 8 colon perforations
Kumar 1998 [14] Retrospective Gunshot wounds 33 0/13 colon perforations 2 to 43 days
→ 13 colon perforations
Quickgley 2006 [6] Retrospective Low speed gunshot wounds 114 4/27 bowel perforations 5 days, broad spectrum
→ 27 bowel perforations: (3/15 colon perforations)
→ 12 upper GI tract
→ 15 colon
Rabinowitz 2012 [7] Retrospective Gunshot wounds 51 bowel perforations: 1/51 bowel perforations 24-48 hours broad spectrum for prophylaxis vs prolonged treatment for documented infections
→ 25 upper GI tract
    → 26 colon